Articles Posted in Domestic Violence

In Florida, someone who has been convicted of a crime can consider appealing a conviction to obtain relief from the conviction and sentence.  The criminal court system allows appeal.  However, most lower court decisions are upheld.  Therefore, attempting to appeal a case may be a significant challenge.  Some appeals are a matter of right and some are discretionary on the part of the appellate court.  Generally, the party the files the appeal attempts to show a material error on the part of the trial court.

What Type of Error is Substantial?

The appellate courts distinguish between harmless error and a material error.  Where an appellate court reviews an error as harmless, it is not considered to have a substantial impact on the disposition and eventual result of the case.  Where an error by a trial court does not show that it affects the substantial rights of a party, it may be difficult to prove that a material mistake was made by the trial court and obtain relief.

Is There a Warrant Issued in My Name?

There are numerous warrants issued for almost every type of crime that occurs in Florida.  The warrant system is used to apprehend criminals and those accused of a crime.  Despite the belief that warrants expire, they do not.  Additionally, warrants can be executed at anytime.  Just because you may not be located within the territory of the state that issued a warrant, you are not safe from exposure to arrest.  It is common for warrants to be issued for both felonies and misdemeanors in Florida.  A warrant will be active until it is served, the individual dies, or the judge recalls the warrant.  It is important to resolve a warrant promptly, so one does not have to deal with a multitude of problems unexpectedly.  Your arrest could result from the most minor traffic stop for a tailgate light.

The FDLE has a database which usually lists active warrants and may be found online at http://www.fdle.state.fl.us/.  You can select “search wanted persons” and you will be taken to a search screen.

            The Sixth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States provides that:

            In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of counsel for his defense.

            The Constitution does not define what a speedy trial means.  There is a Speedy Trial Act governing federal criminal charges and in Florida state trials there is a criminal rule of procedure that addresses speedy trial.  The Florida rule provides for Speedy Trial without Demand which requires defendants to be brought to trial within 90 days from the arrest on a misdemeanor, or 175 days from the arrest for a felony.  There is also a provision for Speedy Trial Upon Demand this provides that every person charged with a crime by indictment or information shall have the right to demand a trial within 60 days by filing a pleading entitled “Demand for Speedy Trial”.  These provisions can be found in Florida Rules of Criminal Procedure Rule 3.191.

When Should You File a Post Conviction Relief Motion in Florida?

A motion for post conviction relief is a motion that is filed after an individual is convicted of a crime where the court is being asked to relieve a person from their conviction.  The following grounds may be used as the reason for filing:

  1. The sentence imposed was illegal or violates the Florida or United States Constitution.

So you went to court and fought a domestic violence injunction, but the Court found grounds to enter the injunction anyway.  What does that mean for you and your rights?  The following is a list of consequences that may be imposed upon you as a result of the injunction:

  • May be ordered to complete a 26-week Batterer’s Intervention Program (BIP)
  • Loss of concealed carry rights

You have been served with a domestic violence injunction in Florida.  Now what?  Though you have been served with an injunction, most people don’t understand what you should and should not do to abide by an injunction.  See below some handy rules of thumb:

  • DO hire an attorney to represent you as soon as possible
  • DON’T contact the petitioner and/or ask the petitioner to drop the injunction

Conceal CarryThe Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (the Department) issues licenses to carry concealed weapons or concealed firearms in the State of Florida and they are good for 7 years.  Concealed weapons or concealed firearms are defined as a handgun, electronic weapon or device, tear gas gun, knife, or billie, but does not include a machine gun. You must carry the license at all times you have possession of the weapon or firearm and must display the license and valid I.D. upon demand by a law enforcement officer or be assessed a $25 fine for a violation.

According to section 790.06, Florida Statutes, the Department shall deny a license if the applicant has been found guilty of, had adjudication of guilt withheld for, or had imposition of sentence suspended for one or more crimes of violence constituting a misdemeanor, unless 3 years have elapsed since probation or any other conditions set by the court have been fulfilled or the record has been sealed or expunged.  The Department shall revoke a license if the licensee has been found guilty of, had adjudication of guilt withheld for, or had imposition of sentence suspended for one or more crimes of violence within the preceding 3 years.

The Department shall, upon notification by a law enforcement agency, a court, or the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) and subsequent written verification, suspend a license or the processing of an application for a license if the licensee or applicant is arrested or formally charged with a crime that would disqualify such person from having a license until final disposition of the case. The Department shall suspend a license or the processing of an application for a license if the licensee or applicant is issued an injunction that restrains the licensee or applicant from committing acts of domestic violence or acts of repeat violence.

Domestic Violence

By Adam Glanzman (Flickr: asg.fbc.vsOSU.11.30.131225 copy) [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The sports world was rocked when journalist Brett McMurphy recently published an article about Ohio State former assistant coach Zach Smith and domestic violence with his wife, Courtney Smith.  Despite indications that Head Coach Urban Meyer knew about the abuse between the Smiths, Meyer denied knowledge of the 2015 incident between them in a Big Ten media days press conference.  Apparently, Zach Smith was arrested in 2009 on suspicion of aggravated battery against his pregnant wife in Florida when Meyer was coaching at the University of Florida.  Meyer knew of the 2009 incident and hired him to be Ohio State’s wide receivers coach anyway. Zach Smith was then charged with criminal trespassing in May 2018 at his now ex-wife’s home and his ex-wife was granted a protective order.  There were nine police reports involving the Smiths between 2012 and 2018.  The story with Urban Meyer has yet to play out—but it is agreed Zach Smith has a serious issue with domestic violence.

If you are accused of domestic violence in Florida, the number one thing you must remember is to REMAIN SILENT.  Ask for an attorney and do not give any statement to police, written or otherwise.  Also remember that you cannot contact the victim! There may be protective orders in place and anything you say or do to the victim can be used against you.  It is difficult when there are children involved but contact your lawyer for advice on how to deal with timesharing. Courts treat domestic violence very seriously and you can find yourself in jail for quite a while if you are not careful to follow orders in place.  As in Zach Smith’s case, you could find yourself with additional charges like trespassing and stalking.

Under Florida law, Domestic Violence Battery is defined as any actual and intentional touching or striking of another person without consent, or the intentional causing of bodily harm to another person, when the person struck is a family or household member.  Penalties can include up to one year in jail or 12 months probation and up to a $1,000.00 fine.  You may also face completion of a 26 week Batterer’s Intervention Program (BIP), additional community service hours, loss of concealed carry rights, and 5 days required jail if you are adjudicated guilty and there is bodily injury.

National headlines were made when the wife of former U.S. Open champion Lucas Glover was arrested for domestic violence battery and resisting arrest in St. Johns County, Florida on May 13, 2018.  The altercation allegedly occurred after Lucas Glover missed the 54-hole cut at The Players Championship.  Lucas Glover told authorities that his wife gets violent every time he does not play well in a major PGA Tournament.  There were allegedly visible injuries on Lucas Glover and his mother.  Krista Glover faces a court date on May 31, 2018 and was released on a $2,500 bond.

Krista Glover is charged under F.S. 784.03 which states the offense of battery occurs when a person:

1) actually and intentionally touches or strikes another person against the will of the other; or

Are you living in Jacksonville and being affected by a stalker? Do you want a court order to stop the stalker?

Continue reading to find out how to file an Injunction for Protection Against Stalking to protect you or your child!

It can be a very scary experience to be the victim of a stalker, especially if it is someone you know and trusted. There are steps that you can take to protect yourself under the law in Florida that will help give you peace of mind. Florida Statutes section 784.0485 provides for a cause of action for an injunction for protection against stalking, including cyberstalking. A stalking injunction can be filed on your behalf or on the behalf of a minor child if you are the parent or legal guardian of the child and the child is living with you.

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